logo

Against Monopoly

defending the right to innovate

Monopoly corrupts. Absolute monopoly corrupts absolutely.





Copyright Notice: We don't think much of copyright, so you can do what you want with the content on this blog. Of course we are hungry for publicity, so we would be pleased if you avoided plagiarism and gave us credit for what we have written. We encourage you not to impose copyright restrictions on your "derivative" works, but we won't try to stop you. For the legally or statist minded, you can consider yourself subject to a Creative Commons Attribution License.


back

Outrageous Treaty Nonsense, or The Copyright Tail Wagging the Internet Dog

David Post over at Volokh.com lends his (blogging) voice against the international cabal (and I don't feel that such a phrase is hyperbole in this instance) that is trying to foist a stricter copyright regime throughout the world via the ACTA treaty.

Read it here:

http://volokh.com/2010/03/26/outrageous-treaty-nonsense-or-the-copyright-tail-wagging-the-internet-dog/


Comments

I believe there is an overlooked aspect in the ACTA treaty. This is one of those cases of being careful for what you are asking for. The demand is for even greater "intellectual property" protection. The problem is that many components of the US economy, such as manufacturing, are moving overseas to countries that are cheaper.

A recent commenter on a New York Times pointed out that research and development will also move overseas for the same reason. If we claim strong "intellectual property" rights, we may find ourselves on the losing end when other countries start demand licensing/rental fees from us for our use of their "intellectual property".

We may be at the "top" now, but this country is running trade and budgetary deficits. There is also continued concern over the lack of quality education. Eventually we may have a brain deficit too as researchers move to greener and cheaper pastures. Once other countries demand conformance with their "intellectual property" rights protection, will we (as a nation) conform with their demands?

PS: Just to be clear, I would not support ACTA, so-called "intellectual property" has become an onerous burden to the free exchange of information and personal rights.

I believe there is an overlooked aspect in the ACTA treaty. This is one of those cases of being careful for what you are asking for. The demand is for even greater "intellectual property" protection. The problem is that many components of the US economy, such as manufacturing, are moving overseas to countries that are cheaper.

A recent commenter on a New York Times pointed out that research and development will also move overseas for the same reason. If we claim strong "intellectual property" rights, we may find ourselves on the losing end when other countries start demand licensing/rental fees from us for our use of their "intellectual property".

We may be at the "top" now, but this country is running trade and budgetary deficits. There is also continued concern over the lack of quality education. Eventually we may have a brain deficit too as researchers move to greener and cheaper pastures. Once other countries demand conformance with their "intellectual property" rights protection, will we (as a nation) conform with their demands?

PS: Just to be clear, I would not support ACTA, so-called "intellectual property" has become an onerous burden to the free exchange of information and personal rights.

Steve:

Regarding demanding conformance with IP rights. That might be interesting. Severe violation of IP rights is a criminal offense in China. You could end up in prison for infringement!

Well, I wonder why post appeared twice? Oh Well.

Let's connect some dots. The US went into Panama to take out Noriega. We evidently have DEA agents in Afghanistan helping with poppy control. So we are willing to extend the reach of our laws into foreign countries. We now have an intellectual property Czar to assure that intellectual property is protected.

We owe the Chinese a lot of money. By the looks of things we will be owing them even more. Not only that, but they are buying US assets. Geely to buy Volvo from Ford for $1.8 billion. Previously China bought IBM's personal computer business. Eventually, (hypothetically of course) we may find some poor Volvo owner approached, at the request of the Chinese government, by our intellectual property czar concerning unauthorized modifications to the car and provided with a one-way cruise to a Chinese prison. After all, if we can extend the reach of our laws, why not the Chinese?

Steve:

lol...and scary at the same time. However, patent laws are enforced subject to the laws of the country in which the patent was granted. So, unless the Chinese are able to convince the U.S. government to make patent infringement punishable by up to three years in prison, the maximum period in China, it is lot likely to happen.

You make a really great point about the U.S. owing money too. O-Bomb-Duh has policies that are absorbing money at the fastest rate in the history of the United States. Take that George Bush, Jr.! So, will those with a sense of entitlement keep him in office or will the people who realize his rocket plane growth in government is a complete catastrophe put a halt to his shenanigans.

I hope people are voting in the next election.

"However, patent laws are enforced subject to the laws of the country in which the patent was granted." Unfortunately that concept is under attack.

Canada Also Getting Pushed By EU On Ridiculous Copyright Policies

Senate Wants To Send US Copyright Cops To Foreign Countries

Whether anything mentioned in the articles above actually gets done, is unknown. Nevertheless these concepts are being mentioned and may gain traction.

Steve:

I have always loved the U.S. Heck, I even served in the military for her. However, people are participating in government less and less, and our "politicians" are doing some pretty absurd stuff. Worse, the idiots who keep saying that "copyright is dead" are obviously not watching the news. It takes action to make things happen, and the "copyright is dead" crowd are sleeping while the fox is fryin' up the chikins. Serious, man, people have got to vote.


Submit Comment

Blog Post

Name:

Email (optional):

Your Humanity:

Prove you are human by retyping the anti-spam code.
For example if the code is unodosthreefour,
type 1234 in the textbox below.

Anti-spam Code
NineSixNineSeven:


Post



   

Most Recent Comments

The right to rub smooth using a hardened steel tool with ridges Finally got around to looking at the comments, sorry for delay... Replying to Stephan: I'm sorry

Let's See: Pallas, Pan, Patents, Persephone, Perses, Poseidon, Prometheus... Seems like a kinda bizarre proposal to me. We just need to abolish the patent system, not replace

The right to rub smooth using a hardened steel tool with ridges I'm a bit confused by this--even if "hired to invent" went away, that would just change the default

Do we need a law? @ Alexander Baker: So basically, if I copy parts of 'Titus Andronicus' to a webpage without

Do we need a law? The issue is whether the crime is punished not who punishes it. If somebody robs our house we do

Do we need a law? 1. Plagiarism most certainly is illegal, it is called "copyright infringement". One very famous

Yet another proof of the inutility of copyright. The 9/11 Commission report cost $15,000,000 to produce, not counting the salaries of the authors.

WKRP In Cincinnati - Requiem For A Masterpiece P.S. The link to Amazon's WKRP product page:

WKRP In Cincinnati - Requiem For A Masterpiece Hopefully some very good news. Shout! Factory is releasing the entire series of WKRP in Cincinnati,

What's copywritable? Go fish in court. @ Anonymous: You misunderstood my intent. I was actually trying to point out a huge but basic

Rights Violations Aren't the Only Bads I hear that nonsense from pro-IP people all the

Intellectual Property Fosters Corporate Concentration Yeah, I see the discouragement of working on a patented device all the time. Great examples

Music without copyright Hundreds of businessmen are looking for premium quality article distribution services that can be

Les patent trolls ne sont pas toujours des officines

Les patent trolls ne sont pas toujours des officines

Patent Lawyers Who Don't Toe the Line Should Be Punished! Moreover "the single most destructive force to innovation is patents". We'd like to unite with you

Bonfire of the Missalettes!

Does the decline in total factor productivity explain the drop in innovation? So, if our patent system was "broken," TFP of durable goods should have dropped. Conversely, since

Does the decline in total factor productivity explain the drop in innovation? I wondered about TFP, because I had heard that TFP was increasing. Apparently, it depends on who

Music without copyright I do agree with all the ideas you have presented in your post. They are very convincing and will